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Abstract

As higher education accountability increases and financial resources decrease, concerns over student retention rates and the reasons why students remain at a post-secondary institution have moved to the forefront. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on freshman students’ performance at a university in the southeastern region of the United States. The researchers conducted an exploratory observational study using pre-existing data from the Freshman Orientation Survey (Brown, 2012), which included a sample of 209 participants. A series of descriptive and frequency analyses were conducted. Then, a series of correlational analyses were conducted among the intrinsic and extrinsic variables and participant’s first-semester and first-year grade point averages. The results suggest there are weak relationships between the reason for attendance, both intrinsically and extrinsically, and a student’s grade point average.

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