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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the number of teaching strategies used during instruction on the physical activity levels of students. Observations were conducted during a collegiate intermediate swimming class taught by an assistant professor at a university in the southeast United States. The class consisted of 16 undergraduate students from varying backgrounds and major fields of study. The professor was observed for the use of Graham’s (2001) 16 teaching strategies. Teaching behaviors were observed using a simple event recording sheet to allow for the occurrence or lack of occurrence of certain teaching strategies to be recorded. Student activity levels were measured using a modification of the SOFIT developed and validated by McKenzie (2009). The data showed an average of 9 of the 16 teaching strategies was used during instruction. Percentage of time spent at a moderate level ranged from 19% - 57% with an average of 35% of observed class time being spent at a moderate intensity level. Analysis of the data showed that there was little correlation between the number of teaching strategies used and the level of physical activity of the students.

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